Advice For Those Consumers Contemplating An Insolvency Filing

Filing for personal bankruptcy may seem like the best way to deal with a mountain of debt. However, if the debt is due to uncontrolled spending, the problem will not go away, just because of a bankruptcy filing. Continue reading for some insights on personal bankruptcy to help educate yourself on what this legal tool can and cannot do.

If you are being faced with home foreclosure, wage garnishments or other situations that make it necessary to file for bankruptcy quickly, you may want to explore an emergency filing. Regular bankruptcy filings entail approximately 50 pages of paperwork and one to two weeks for an attorney to pull everything together. In an emergency filing, your attorney can file just the first 2 necessary pages and keep creditors from continuing foreclosure or garnishment proceedings. The rest of the work will be completed afterward.

Be certain to gain a thorough understanding of personal bankruptcy by using online resources. The United States D.O.J., the A.B.I and the N.A.C.B.A. are all useful organizations willing to provide educational material. As with everything in life, the more you know about filing a claim, the better off you'll be. You can properly prepare when you know what you're preparing for.

Since filing for bankruptcy is quite a complicated process, it is recommended that you find yourself a lawyer that specializes in bankruptcy. There is usually some sort of a fee associated with hiring one though. However, if you can not afford one, you should still look into one since there are organizations that could help you out with the cost of one.



Do not feel embarrassed or guilty about filling for bankruptcy. Many people fear that they will be treated as second class citizens after they declare themselves bankrupt. However, this is not the case. The option to 'declare yourself bankrupt' was developed by the government to enable assistance to be given to people who find themselves overwhelmed with debt and in need of a fresh start. Last year, over 1.4 million people filed bankruptcy and the majority of them are now living a happy, debt-free life. So, there is no need for you to be afraid of bankruptcy stigma.

A great personal bankruptcy tip is to take care of your monetary problems sooner, rather than later. You can always seek the help of counselors for free if you're worried about your finances. Dealing with bankruptcy when it's a bigger problem is not a situation you really want to be in.

Filing for bankruptcy does not wipe out all of your debts. It does not stop you from having to pay alimony, child support, student loans, tax debt and most types of secured credit. You will not be allowed to file if these are the only types of debt that you have on record.

Check all of your paperwork before filing, even if you used an attorney. While attorneys can be irreplaceable guides when it comes to personal bankruptcy, they often deal with multiple cases simultaneously. It's in your best interest, as its your financial future, to check all paperwork before it gets submitted.

Make sure that you fully understand the implications of declaring yourself bankrupt. Once you have filed for bankruptcy, you will find it difficult to secure any credit at all. While you may not see that consequence as a huge problem at the moment, if you wish to purchase a home in the future, or lease an automobile, you are probably going to need the credit.


Don't make the mistake of hesitating to file for bankruptcy because you think you won't be able to file again and may need to save it for a worse financial situation. The laws vary from state to state, but you may file again after a certain period, usually two to eight years, depending on the type of bankruptcy filed. Of course, you won't want to file again, but in case of job loss or a major illness, the opportunity is there if you need it.

Consider Chapter 13 bankruptcy. If you are receiving money on a regular basis and your unsecured debt is under $250,000, you may be able to file Chapter 13 bankruptcy. This type of bankruptcy protects your assets from seizure and lets you repay your credits over the course of a few years. That plan lasts approximately three to five years, and then you are discharged from unsecured debt. Missing a payment under these plans can result in total dismissal by the courts.

Remember that bankruptcy takes an emotional toll, and prepare yourself for the feelings that may accompany the process. Feelings of shame and depression are common, even if you ultimately feel relieved. Ensure that you have an adequate support network of friends and family to help you through the tough times you may experience.

Think about any co-debtors you have prior to filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy. When filing Chapter 7, you are not legally responsible for the debts in your name. This does not dissolve any co-signers of the debt, and your creditors will continue to try and collect from them.

If you have many non-dischargeable debts, filling for bankruptcy may not be very beneficial or advisable. http://business.financialpost.com/personal-finance/debtors-prison-in-ontario-failing-to-pay-child-support-could-land-you-a-jail-sentence-case-shows -dischargeable debts include student loans, taxes, child support payments, fraudulent debts, and alimony payments. Filing for bankruptcy will not dissolve any of those debts and will only make it harder for you to secure credit in the future.

There are two common types of personal bankruptcy. One in which all your assets are liquidated and the other creates a plan to pay off debts within a few years. It is recommended that you meet with an attorney to determine which type of bankruptcy is best for your particular situation.

If you file a Chapter 7 bankruptcy only to find that you are not qualified to use the homestead exemption, you might be able to put place your mortgage in a Chapter 13 case. In some situations it might be better if you convert the whole Chapter 7 bankruptcy into Chapter 13. In this case, you should consult with your attorney to decide on your next step.

Don't let bill collectors mislead you. When you discuss bankruptcy with some bill collectors, they may tell you that bankruptcy will not affect them, and you will still have to pay them. http://www.scotusblog.com/2018/04/argument-preview-court-to-decide-whether-bankruptcy-code-protects-dishonest-debtors/ are not being honest, all of your bills can be covered depending on the bankruptcy option that you fiel.

Always be honest in reporting all income, assets and debts when filing bankruptcy. If you hide any financial information, whether it is intentional or accidental, you run the risk of being barred from filing bankruptcy on those debts listed in your original bankruptcy petition in the future, which means you will have no relief from your financial burdens.

After reading this article, you now have information that should make you feel more secure about the bankruptcy proceedings you may be experiencing. Knowledge can always shed a light on things, and bankruptcy can be easier dealt with, if you use the tips in this article to get through the process.

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